Great Brickhill

transcribed by Ingrid Neale

January 1894 Brickhill (Great)

The season of Christmas is being observed in good old fashioned style. Sir Philip Duncombe has given presents of beef to every household. The prize for the fat ox at Fenny Stratford went towards this object. Mrs. Cullen Maunsell also gave each of the inmates of the almhouses 5 cwt. of coal.

The church was decorated under the superintendence of Mrs. Bloxham by Mrs. Turner, Misses Cobley, Stevens, and others. The anthem prepared for Christmas was one by Stainer, “O Thou that bringeth glad tidings.”

The church bells have rung many a merry peal and have been heard for miles this Christmas time. Altogether, Christmas, with its joyful associations , has been enjoyed by all.

A sale of what was left from the summer sale has been recently held in the schoolroom. Mrs. Bowden, Mrs. Turner, and Mrs. Locke all helped while Mr. and Mrs. Daborn were indefatigable. Altogether the sum of £8 was realised, so that within a very little there is sufficient to pay for the organ restoration.

A carpentering class has been started in the Temperance Hall, in the Rectory ground, and promises to be a great success. The lecturer is Mr. Hawley.

There has unfortunately been a great deal of illness amongst children, so much so that the average attendance, which was 107 in the corresponding quarter of last year, this quarter is only 89. This means a considerable loss of income and fee grant. It is hoped that when the school opens after the Christmas holidays, all the little invalids may be better and able to attend school. Much sympathy has been felt for the little sick ones. The parish seems to be growing smaller in population. Last year there were about 115 children on the books. This year there are only 105, made up of 44 infants and 61 in the mixed school.

The offertories for the past two months have been as follows. - Nov, 5 8s 2 ½ d ; Nov. 19,7s 5½d; Dec. 3, 15s 6d ; Dec. £1 6s 2d., for Society for Propagation of the Gospel; total, £2 17s 4d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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February 1894 Brickhill (Great)

The Xmas Festivities passed off very well. A supper was kindly given to the members of the choir, together with a present.

The number of communicants at Xmas was larger than had been before. A short midnight service was held on the last day of the old year. A goodly number collected at the church.

The past year in the Parish has been comparatively an uneventful one. We have had only one marriage. There have been only four deaths, although there has been a great deal of illness amongst children. The death rate of the parish is therefore small, and for this year would be at the rate of 8 per thousand of the population.

The great drought of 1893 will be long remembered in the parish. Fortunately there was no lack of good drinking water, for man or beast. Yet the land suffered terribly, and the pasture land especially presented a very arid appearance.

It is a matter of satisfaction that the organ in the Church has been thoroughly overhauled and cleaned, and that nearly enough money has been collected for the work.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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March 1894 Brickhill (Great)

On Sunday, February 4, owing to the Rector being attacked by influenza, the services were taken by Rev. J. F. Hood, assistant curate of Leighton Buzzard, and the Rev. F. F. Field, Rector of Woughton.

The carpentering class has been steadily at work, under Mr. Hawley, but it will end this month.

During Lent there are evening services of Wednesdays, at 7 p.m., with sermon; and Matins on Friday morning, at 11.30 a.m.

The Rev. G. Wingate Pearse, Rector of Walton, will preach at the evening service at 6 p.m. on Easter Day. The anthem will be :- Easter Carol by Dr. Bridge - On the Cross we see Him dying.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill January 1894

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April 1894 Brickhill (Great)

Sermons have been preached on Wednesday evenings in Lent amongst others by the Hon & Rev. W. T. Fiennes, rector of Milton Keynes, and the Rev. W. B. Banting, vicar of Little Brickhill, and were much appreciated.

The quarterly meeting of the Church of England Temperance Benefit Society was held at the Priory. One new member joined, Mr. Hart, and one moved to a higher class. An account was also read of a meeting at the People’s Palace, in London, presided over by the Bishop of Marlborough, of the Church of England Temperance Benefit Society. All speakers were unanimous in describing the society as financially sound and solvent. In ten years the funds have risen enormously and the number of members also, Mr. Edward Woods is the Treasurer at Great Brickhill.

The Carpentering Classes have been continued throughout this month under Mr. Hawley, and progress has been made. The Technical Education Classes with one exception have been well taken up in this village and much appreciated. It is hoped that some more lessons will be given in cooking.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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May 1894 Brickhill (Great)

The services on Easter day were bright and hearty, and well attended: they were choral throughout, the celebration of the Holy Communion at mid-day being also partly choral. In the evening the sermon was preached by the Rev. G. W. Pearse, rector of Walton, and listened to with great attention. The service opened with a processional hymn - “Jesus Christ is risen to day.” Mr. Edward Woods played the cornet with the organ, and kept the choir and organ well together. A short Easter anthem, by Dr. Bridge, of Westminster Abbey, words by Archdeacon Farrar, was sung. At the conclusion of the service, Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus was played by the organist, Mr. R. Cox, the concluding voluntary in the morning being Bach’s prelude and fugue in C major.

The church was prettily decorated for the festival, under the superintendence of Mr. Bloxham, and the foreman of the gardens, Mr. Church.

During the summer months the services on Sundays will be as follows: - Early Celebration (except first Sunday in the month ) 8 a.m. ; Matins, ante communion and sermon, (and first Sunday in the month Holy Communion) at 11 a.m. Litany and Baptisms or Catechising, 3 p.m. Choral evensong and sermon, 6 p.m.

There will be offertories on the first Sunday at Matins for the sick and poor; and on the third Sunday in the month at all the services offertory and collection to be handed over to the Churchwardens for church expenses. There will be an occasional Collection for keeping the churchyard in order.

The Easter Vestry Meetings have been held - on each occasion the Rector being in the chair - the first on March 23, when the various parish officers were re-elected to serve until the time of the working of the Parochial Councils Bill. At the second meeting, held in the schoolroom on April 9, the Churchwardens accounts were passed, there being a deficiency of £4 3s 6d., which it was very desirable should be supplied as soon as possible. The Rector also presented the Offertory accounts. A voluntary subscription was agreed to as in former years. The balance sheet of the Heating, Restoration, and Organ Fund was presented and examined, and a vote of thanks was unanimously passed to Sir P.H. and Lady Duncombe, and Mr. Locke, for the trouble and pains they have taken in the matter. The Rector appointed Sir Philip Duncombe , Bart., as his churchwarden and Mr. Locke was unanimously reappointed Parish Churchwarden, and Mr. Bloxham and Mr. Daborn were chosen as sidesmen. The Rector, in lieu of a voluntary subscription, promised to see that the funds for lighting were provided, apart from the offertory.

In the past year four new surplices have been bought, one man’s and three boys’ surplices, and at Easter the Rector gave two new men’s surplices.

Mr. Hickley, of Stockgrove Park, has very kindly given £2 toward the deficiency in the Churchwardens’ account.

The Rector is very anxious to light the church with oil, all over. At present only the centre of the church is so lighted, and, in addition to the lamps there are 50 candles burnt when the church is lighted. Eight new lamps are required for this purpose. The cost of each lamp complete is £1 8s They are of the newest and most improved patent.

The accounts that have been recently published, show that a sum of £253 have been spent on heating the church, restoring and putting in thorough order, and cleansing and enlarging the organ. The church expenses for the past year were about £50, so that, in all, a sum of £300 have recently been spent on the church.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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June 1894 Brickhill (Great)

The coal club has opened and payments are received at the School, every Sat. at 6 o’clock. Its object is, by a regular weekly payment, to enable members to lay up store for the winter; some members, however prefer to pay monthly, but no member will be allowed to be in arrear for more than a month, unless there are special circumstances. Special attention is called to this last rule, as some few leave their payment chiefly till the end of the time, and the objects of the Club has been defeated.

The following have been the offertories and collections since Easter : - April 1st, for Sick and Poor, 7s 6d; April 15th, for Churchwardens’ fund, 14s 3 ½ d; Ascension Day for Sick and Poor, 8s 11 ½ d.; Whit Sunday, for maintenance of Churchyard, 16s 2 ½ d.; may 20, Trinity Sunday for Churchwardens’ fund. £1 5s 0d,; Total £3 11s 11 ½ d

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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July 1894 Brickhill (Great)

The usual quarterly meeting of the Church of England Temperance Benefit Society, was held at the Priory, on Monday, June 11. Mr. E. Woods, the treasurer was present, as also the secretary, the Rev. M.B. Nepean. Most of the members were in attendance.

On Sunday, June 17, at the early Celebration, intercession was made for the work of the Girls’ Friendly Society.

This Sunday was appointed for this object throughout the diocese. The offertory was also devoted to the work of the Girls’ Friendly Society. The Government Inspection of the Schools was held on Tuesday, June 12, by Mr. Martin, and Thursday

June 14 by Mr. Kenney Herbert. There is every reason to believe that the mixed school and the infant school did very well.

There will shortly be a meeting of the parishioners to elect delegates for Technical Education. Notice of time and place will be published. There will also be a meeting shortly of the members of the Society of the Propagation of the Gospel, to receive Collecting Boxes, and give out fresh ones.

The offertories for last month have been, June 3, Sick and Poor, 8s 5 ½d.; June 17, Girls’ Friendly Society, 8s 1d,; June 17, Church Expenses, 15s 6d,; total £1 12s 0 ½ d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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August 1894 Brickhill (Great)

On the Sunday succeeding the birth of the son of T.R.H. the Duke and Duchess of York suitable references were made in the church to the event, and. At the conclusion of the service, the organist played “God Save the Queen.” The bell-ringers, who had been unable, owing to the hay, to meet during the week, rang out a merry peal after the service, in honour of the event.

A census of the Parish has recently been made by the assistant overseer, Mr. John Woods, for the Education Department. It was found that since the last census the parish has decreased by 40, five large families have left the parish. The exact population is now 479, whereas in the earlier part of the century there were over 700 people in the parish.

On Thursday, July 19, a very enjoyable afternoon was spent by the members of the Mothers’ Union of this parish, at Woughton. Lady Duncombe, the president of the society for the Deanery, had sent 33 mothers to the meeting. An excellent tea was provided , and all the mothers expressed themselves very grateful to Mr. and Mrs. Field for the trouble they had taken. Mrs. Levi also kindly permitted the members to walk round her grounds after the service.

A meeting for Technical Education was held on Friday, July 22, at the School, when there were present the Rev. M. Nepean, Mrs. Cullen Maunsell, Mr. and Mrs. Daborn, Mr. and Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Locke, Miss Stevens, and others.

The meeting was in favour for lessons for the girls on nursing, and also lessons on plain cooking. It was stated that the dress making classes did not answer, and were not wished for. The meeting recommended gardening and carpentering as subjects for the boys. The meeting was of opinion that afternoon classes were of no good, and that lessons should be in the evening. It was resolved that Lady Duncombe and Mrs. Maunsell, and and the Rev. M. B. Nepean and Mr. Bloxham be appointed delegates for Great Brickhill. It was suggested that the lessons take place in the schoolroom.

Offertory during the month : July 1, 9s 3 ½ d.; July 15 for Church Expenses, 13s 8 ½ d

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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September 1894 Brickhill (Great)

A meeting was held in the Schoolroom, on July 24, on behalf of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. The Rev. Wingate Pearse, Rector of Walton, and Rural Dean, and the Rev. F. F. Field, Rector of Woughton, and Secretary for the Deanery, attended. Both gave most interesting addresses, which were listened to with great attention, some sixty being present. Hymns were sung during the meeting , and at the conclusion the boxes were opened, and found to contain the following sums: - Lady Pauncefort Duncombe £1 8s 2 ½d., Miss Stevens, 12s 11 ½d., Miss E. Bloxham 3s 7 ½ d., Mrs. Turner 10s 7 ½ d., School 1s 1¾d., Offertories 5s 7 ½ d., Collection at Meeting 9s 3 ¼ d., total, 33 11s 5 ½ d

An organ recital was recently given at Great Brickhill Church by Mr. Gosling, A.R.C.O., organist at St Indeswode, Poplar, the Mission Church of Christ Church Oxford. Mr. Gosling performed with great skill on the organ the following pieces: - Sonato for organ, No 1 Bach; Prelude and Fugue C Minor, Bach; Organ Concerto No 2, Handel; Andante from Organ Sonato No 2, Mendelssohn; Wedding March, Mendelssohn. The selection was entirely organ music, and Mr. Gosling showed himself an advanced player.

A grant of Bibles and Prayers, of the value of £2, has recently been given by the Society for the Promoting Christian Knowledge, for the use of the School The Society will expect the Parish to make some return for the grant, so that some time in the year there will be a collection for the S.P.C.K.

A school treat was given on July 30, by Mrs. Cullen Maunsell, in the grounds of the Lodge, Great Brickhill. The day was most propitious and fine, and the sun shone brilliantly all the time. Besides the scholars of the Day Schools, there were present the teachers and scholars of the Sunday School. A substantial tea was partaken under the trees, and there were games and scrambles for sweets. Lady Duncombe and children, Mrs. Hickley and children, Mrs. Cullen Maunsell, and Rev. M. Nepean were present during the afternoon. A photographer was present and the children were photographed under the trees. The proceedings closed with hearty cheers for, and thanks to, Mrs. Cullen Maunsell.

The School Report has been received, and Mr. and Mrs. Daborn are to be congratulated on the result. The parish has now a first- rate School.

The Schools were examined by E. M. Kenny-Herbert. Esq., and H. Martin, Esq., on the 12th and 14th of June, and the following report has been received:-Mixed School. - “This is an excellent village school. The children are being brought up well and are being well taught. Their behaviour and work are most creditable, and their intelligence shows that all the children of the county are not dullards. The needlework is very good.” - Infants’ Class - “Mrs. Daborn’s division is now in most creditable order. The children’s work is extremely well done; they are happy and intelligent, and I am much pleased with the general condition of the class.”

There will be collections on the first Sunday in September for the Diocesan Fund, according to the directions of the Bishop of Oxford.

Offertories and Collections - August 5, 11 a.m., 16s; 6 p.m. for maintenance of Churchyard, 12s 2d; August 19, for Churchwardens’ Fund for Church Expenses 19s 2 ½ d.; total £2 7s 4 ½ d.

Baptisms Brickhill (Great) 1894

April 1 Lizzie, daughter of Benjamin and Jane Bates

April 1 Annie Ada, daughter of Alonzo and Martha Maria Sinfield.

June 26 Tom North, son of Charles Lushington and Lilian Hickley

June 29 Ethel Winifred, daughter of Harry and Florence Ruggies

July 1 Alfred Lionel, son of William and Sarah Ann Hobbs.

Burial Brickhill (Great) 1894

Aug. 4 Emma Chew aged 63

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October 1894 Brickhill (Great)

A choir treat was given to the Church Choir on Tuesday, September 4. A large brake conveyed the party to Woburn, where dinner was served, by kind permission of the Rev. W. Southey, in the old Vicarage. The party examined the Church, and the organist , Mr. John Gilby, formerly organist of Great Brickhill Church, gave a short recital on the organ. They then ascended the tower, and at 1.30 p.m sat down to dinner in the old Vicarage. Dinner finished, the party proceeded to Ampthill, by kind invitation of Mr. Wingfield, of Ampthill House. The choir sat down to a most sumptuous tea. Mrs. Wingfield allowed her beautiful garden to be explored, and Mr. Wingfield provided cricket and other amusements. The head gardener kindly took the party through the range of glass houses; and lastly, under the guidance of Mr. Wingfield, the church was viewed, and much interest was shown in the East window of the Church many of the choir recognizing in the window the faces of those they had known. At 7.30 p.m., a start was made for home, which was reached without mishap about 9 p.m. All seemed to enjoy the day . The provision for the dinner were provided by Lady Duncombe and Mrs. Cullen Maunsell, both also subscribing to the expenses of the treat.

The Church Bells have recently been thoroughly examined by an expert. They were cast over 100 years ago, by the old firm of Mears, in the year 1788. The tenor bell weighs 14 cwt, and is F in the scale. The 5th bell was re-cast in the year 1840, since which date very little has been done to the bells. They now require re-hanging, the clappers altered, and the framework strengthened. An estimate has been given, and to put them in thorough working order will cost nearly £100. - The small bell which rings just before the service commences bears the date 1631, but there is no evidence as to who cast it. This work will soon have to be set in hand, as the bearings and fittings are all very much worn.

The Harvest Festival will take place at Great Brickhill Church on Thursday, October 4, at 7 p.m., and will be continued on the following Sunday. The Anthem will be “Send out thy light and thy truth.” (Gounod.) The sermon will be preached by the Rev. Cecil Maunsell, M.A. Rector of Thorpe Malsor.

The offertories and collections for the past month have been: September 2, diocesan Fund, £1 8s 6s; September 16, Church Expenses, 17s 4 ½ d; Total. £2 5s 10 ½ d.

Marriages Brickhill (Great) 1894

James Sylvester of Linslade, and Sarah Annie Meachem of this parish.

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November 1894 Brickhill (Great)

The Harvest Thanksgiving services were held on Thursday, October 4, and continued on the following Sunday. The day commenced with a celebration of the Holy Eucharist; and evensong, with sermon, took place at 7 p.m. The Church had been very prettily decorated by kind helpers, amongst them being Mrs. Bloxham, Miss Rice, Miss Stevens, and Miss Cleghorn, while Mr. Church superintended the whole Evensong was fully choral, and commenced with a processional hymn, “Now thank we, all our God,” The processional cross was carried by Mr. S. D. Bird. formerly organist of Great Brickhill Church. A very forcible sermon was preached by Rev. Cecil Maunsell, rector of Thorpe Malsor, and nephew of the late Lady Pauncefort Duncombe. Mr. R. Cox presided with great skill at the organ, while the concluding voluntary was played by W. Levi, Esq. The anthem was entitled “Send out thy light and thy truth,” by Gounod. The lessons were read by the Rev. C. Grove, rector of Bow Brickhill, and the Rev. the Hon. Wingfield Twisleton Wykeham Fiennes, rector of Milton Keynes. The sum of £5 4s 8d. was collected at all the services, which was divided between the fund for the restoration of the Church Bells and other church expenses. Mr. E. Woods accompanied the hymns with great efficiency on the cornet.

During the winter months the early celebration of the Holy Communion will be at 8.30 instead of 8 o’clock.

A concert will be given at the School most probably on Thursday, November 15, and commencing at 7.30 p.m.

A Reading Room will be opened at the Schoolroom, Sir Philip Duncombe having kindly allowed the use of the room for that purpose.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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December 1894 Brickhill (Great)

During the winter months the services on Sundays will be as follows : — Early Celebration (except 1st Sunday in the month) 8.30 a.m. ; Matins, Litany, Ante Communion and Sermon, 11 a.m. ; Evensong, 3 p.m.; Choral Evensong and Sermon, 6 p.m.

There will be a Confirmation in the Parish Church by the Lord Bishop of Oxford, on Thursday, March 21, 1895, for this parish. All those who wish to be confirmed are requested bo give in their names to the Rector at once.

The preliminary meeting for the appointment of Parish Councillors will be held on December 4, at 7 p.m. It is to be hoped that politics will be kept out of the question, and that the best men will be appointed.

There will be a meeting of the Church of England temperance Society at the School, on Tuesday, December 11, at 7 p.m. The meeting will be addressed by the Rev. W. B. Banting, vicar of Little Brickhill, and the Rev. Langton Douglas, the diocesan secretary.

The following is the report of the diocesan inspector in Religious Knowledge, the Rev. F. F. Field, Rector of Woughton. The children throughout the school (both the elder children and the infants) passed a most creditable examination. It is evident that much interest and care have been taken in teaching religious knowledge. There is a good church tone in the school. Perhaps the weak point is the written work It would, I think, be a good thing for the children to practise writing out the Catechism. The hymns were well sung, and portions of Holy Scripture were repeated correctly. The discipline was very good. Among the older children the best answers were given by Mary King (to whom I gave the Bishop's prize) by and Ethel Bloxham (who received the prize last year). I wish also to commend (in group 3) Annie Tooth, Marian King. William Meacham, and Patience Daborn ; (in group 2) John King, Florence Mobbs and James Stevens. Of the infants, I wish to commend Lottie Tooth, Sarah Curtis, Lily Bates, Emily Turner, and Emily Bull.

During the season of Advent there will be Evensong, with sermon, on Wednesdays at 7 p.m., and Matins on Fridays, at 11.30 a.m.

The offertories for the past month have been as follows :—For sick and poor, 16s. 9£d. ; for Church Expenses, £1 3s. Od. ; Total £1 19s. 9£d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for Great Brickhill 1894

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January 1895 Brickhill (Great)

The elections for the Parish Council have passed off quietly, and without a poll. At the preliminary meeting the chairman elected was Mr. A. Sheffield. W. Knight, Mr. Bowden, Mr. W. Turner, Mr. W. Clements, Mr J. Curtis, Mr. J. Sinfield, Mr. W. Henman. The Rector, in proposing a vote of thanks to Mr. Sheffield, said how proud they were of him. He had begun his career at Great Brickhill years back, and had since distinguished himself in every position he had held. Mr. Sheffield was now chief registrar for the the Parish of Poplar in London. His management of the meeting was strictly impartial and met the approval of all. At the conclusion, Mr. Sheffield gave an address, pointing out that there was no royal road to success but through real hard, persevering work. The District Councillor is Mr. James Curtis.

A meeting of the C.E.T.S. was held at Great Brickhill lately, The meeting was addressed by the Rev. Langton Douglas, Diocesan Secretary for C.E.T.S. was one of the oldest branches in the neighbourhood. There was also attached to this Society a branch of the Church of England Temperance Benefit Society. Mr. Langton Douglas gave a most interesting address, enlivened by many amusing illustrations. It is determined to resume the monthly meetings of the Society at the school on the first Mondays in the month. At the conclusion of the meeting, a vote of thanks to Mr. Douglas was proposed by Mr. J. Sinfield, P.C. and seconded by Mr. Cox , secretary to the Society.

The village during the past year has been wonderfully healthy. Up to date, out of a population of nearly 500, there has been only one death. This is a cause for great thankfulness, although we fear there are some invalids at the present time.

Last week a very successful entertainment was given at the School. It consisted of songs, recitation, and readings. Amongst those who took part were the Rev. Nepean, Misses Tooth, Mary Meades, Eliza Meacham, and Emma Tooth, Messrs., Sinfield, Pc., and Henman, P.C., E. Woods, F. Church, Langler, Claridge, Strange, Meacham, E. Hobbs, A. Hobbs, J. Sinfield , jun., G. Sinfield, W. Sinfield, G. Eavestaff, J. Stevens, and W. Eavestaff, The accompaniments was played by Mr. R. Cox. The proceeds were for the reading room. Where all did their parts well, it would be invidious to mention any; but a thoroughly pleasant evening was passed, and a hope was expressed on all sides that there would be another like entertainment.

The offertories for December were - December 3 (half sick and poor, half churchyards) 10s. 4 ½d ; December 16 (for church expenses)12s 11 ½d.; total £1 3s 4d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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February 1895 Brickhill (Great)

The season of Christmas has been kept in a good old-fashioned way at this parish. Almost every man, woman and child has had a present of some sort. Sir Philip and Lady Duncombe have been most kind in distributing presents to all. The only hope is that this kindness has been duly appreciated. Some people think because these kind gifts are repeated year after year that therefore they are endowed charities, and left by will. This is not the case, Of course there are the proper endowed charities, such as the Feoffe Charity and others, but all these kind presents are the free gift of the givers, and all those who give have given them with greatest pleasure; they only wish their gifts to be appreciated, and that their kind thought for others should be understood.

Mrs. Cullen Maunsell has also given coal to the inmates of the almshouse.

On February 7 and 8 there will be an entertainment at the Schoolroom, given by the children of the National School, under the superintendence of Mr. and Mrs. Daborn.

An old much-respected inhabitant has just passed away, at the ripe age of 78. Miss Susan Cherry had been bred and born in Great Brickhill, and was in more ways than one a link with the past. Her mother only died a few years since, at the age of 91, and the village shop which was kept by the late Miss Cherry had been in the family for no less than 200 years. During that time the old familiar house has hardly been touched, and its familiar sight with its carefully lopped trees in front must have been noticed by many passers by. Miss Susan Cherry was a faithful and staunch member of the Church of England, and was held in high esteem by all her neighbours and friends.

There will be a concert on Shrove Tuesday towards providing funds for new surplices for the Choir.

The late inclement weather has seriously interfered with the congregation at the church. It is to be hoped that when better weather ensues this will be altered.

s.
d.
The offertory for January 6, for Sick and Poor,
7
5
The offertory for January 20 for Church Expenses
4
1
£1
1
6

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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March 1895 Brickhill (Great)

During the Season of lent there will be the Evensong on Wednesdays at 7 p.m., together with a sermon. There will be one exception, the week commencing Sunday, March 24, when the evening service will be on Friday evening, March 29. Clergymen from neighbouring parishes, have kindly consented to preach, so it is to be hoped everyone, from the highest to the lowest will make an effort to attend these services. The following is the list of Preachers: - Ash Wednesday, Matins, Litany and Commination Service, 11.30 a.m., Evensong 7 p.m., with sermon. March 6 Rev. C. Luxmore, Rector of Broughton; March 13, Rev. H. Lomas, Vicar of Ridgmount; March 20, Rev. D. Elsdale, Rector of Moulsoe; March 29, Rev. the Hon W. Twistleton Wykeham Fiennes, Rector of Milton Keynes; April 3, Rev. Edgar Milne, Rector of Shenley; April 10, Rev. J. T. Athawes Rector of Loughton; 7 p.m. (Easter Day) The Rev. G. W. Pearse, Rector of Walton and Rural Dean. On Wednesday, March 20, the Rev. D. Elsdale will chiefly address the candidates for confirmation, and the tickets will be given at this service to the candidates. On Wednesday in Holy Week the Rev. J. T. Athawes will preach on Holy Communion.

On the first Sunday in March the full evensong at 3 p.m. will be discontinued till further notice, but there will be in its place the Litany, and on the second Sunday in the month Children’s Service, with catechism. There will be evensong, with sermon, as usual, at 6 p.m.

There will be a meeting of Sunday School Teachers on the Second Monday in each Month, at the Schools, at 4 p.m. Miss Annie Turner has consented to take a class in the Sunday School, but more teachers are needed. The Rector will be glad to hear of anyone who would be willing to take a class regularly.

During the past winter efforts have been made to relieve the monotony of village life. There has been a Rummage Sale by Lady Duncombe and others, for the rehanging of the church bells.

There have been entertainments of some sort almost every week. The Little Brickhill Niggers gave an entertainment one week; the young men of the Reading Room have given two entertainments. The last entertainment was very successful.

The entertainment of the season has undoubtedly been given by the children, under the superintendence of Mr. and Mrs. Daborn, the master and mistress. It was excellently got up, and the children did their parts admirably. The pieces were well chosen. The first part consisted of recitations and songs. The second part was a charming cantata, entitled “The Flower Queen,” each little girl representing a flower, dressed in a pretty white frock. The flowers all vied with one another in their desire to be Queen, but as from time immemorial, the rose gained the prize; and the cantata concluded with a pretty scene in which Elsie Turner, representing the Rose, was crowned as Queen. The stage was prettily arranged, and the singing behind the scenes was very effective.

On Saturday, February 16, a very charming exhibition of dissolving views was given by the Rev. R. Tindal of Leighton Buzzard. Those who missed seeing it missed a great treat, as some of the slides were of the best possible descriptions. There was, first of all, a lecture with views, entitled “Round the World,” and slides with mechanical effect. The proceeds were devoted to buying new surplices for the choir, but being Saturday night, the lecture only realised 8s 11d.

There are at present four technical lectures given in the parish: Monday evenings Ambulance, under Mr. Buxton; Tuesday and Thursdays, Carpentering Classes, under Mr. E. Tooth; and Sick Nursing in connection with the Mothers’ Meeting at Brickhill Manor, by Miss Deyns. The first two classes are held in the Schoolroom. All the classes seem well liked.

A double marriage was celebrated in Great Brickhill on Monday Feb. 18, and produced quite a sensation in the village. Thomas King married Mary Munday, and Kate King married George Robert Willison, the two Kings being brother and sister, and members of a much respected family in Great Brickhill. We wish them every happiness. The organist played the Wedding March at the conclusion of the service, and the Bells rang out a merry peal.

The offertories for past month are - For Sick and Poor, 6s 4d; for Church Expenses, 12s 6d; total 18s 10d.

Marriages Brickhill (Great) 1895

Feb. 18 Francis King and Mary Munday

Feb. 18 George Robert Willison and Kate King.

Burials Brickhill (Great)

Jan Susan Cherry, aged 78.

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April Brickhill (Great) 1895

The epidemic of influenza has been very severe in this parish. - Almost every house has been attacked, and few have escaped.

Much interest has been aroused by the approaching confirmation. There are in all 23 candidates, 13 female and 10 male candidates. At the commencement there were 15 female candidates, but one of these were confirmed with the Linslade candidates,while the other has left for London, where she will shortly be confirmed. The names of the candidates are as follows: Males - William Turner, Arthur Cox, Harold Bloxham, William Eavestaff, George Eavestaff, Charles Langler, Frederic Battams, James Sinfield, William Thomas, Meade Horne, Alfred Tooth, Females. - Elizabeth Grace Cordell, Jane Warner, Annie Florence Turner, Ethel Kate Bloxham, Lilian Mary Mobbs, Sarah Jane Sinfield, Sarah Elizabeth Boone, Susan Sinfield, Elizabeth Sarah Ping, May Isabel Adams, Maud Ellen Arnold, Ada Stevensm Mary Elizabeth Lovell.

Some new surplices have lately been procured for our choir. Mrs. Locke, Miss Bagot, Mrs.----ing, cut out and made the surplices from patterns.

The following are the subscriptions for the surplices. Receipts - Rev. M. Nepean, 10s: Sir P. Pauncefort Duncombe, 5s; Mrs. Cullen Maunsell 5s; Mrs. Chas. Woods, 10s; proceeds of Entertainment, 8s 4d; total £1 18s; balance in hand 4d.

There will be matins and evensong daily during Holy Week at 11.30 a.m. and 7 p.m.

On Easter Day evensong and sermon by the Rev. Wingate Pearse willl be at 6 p.m.

Offertories, Sick and Poor 6s 3d. Church Expenses 11s 1d., total 17s 4d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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May 1895 Brickhill (Great)

The Confirmation in this Parish is almost ancient history now. There were, in all, from the parishes of Great Brickhill, Little Brickhill, Bow Brickhill, and Stoke Hammond, 74 candidates. The Bishop of Oxford delivered an excellent address to the candidates, and the service was quietly and reverently conducted. The choir, surpliced, headed by the cross bearer, met the Bishop and Clergy at the Rectory, and walked in procession to the church, which they entered singing the well-known hymn “Soldiers of Christ arise.” The service at once proceeded, the Rector reading the opening address. There were present with their candidates, the Revs. W. B. Banting, Grove, and Pain. The Veni Creator was sung kneeling, before the laying-on of hands to Attwood’s setting. The Rev. D. Elsdale, addressed the candidates the evening before, and at this service the cards of approval were given to the candidates. The confirmation of 1895, by the Bishop of Oxford, will be long remembered by Great Brickhill. Many of the candidates received their first Communion on Easter Day, at the early celebration, at 8 a.m.

Thanks are due to all those clergymen who came and preached on the Wednesday evenings in Lent. Those who were unable to attend lost much by their absence.

The Easter Day services were bright, and cheerful and the early celebration was well attended. At the evening service the sermon was preached by the Rev. Wingate Pearse, who has kindly helped (as in several years past) on Easter Day. The service began with a procession, headed by the processional cross, carried by a member of the choir. The joyous Easter hymn, “Christ, the Lord, is risen to-day.” being sung. The collections throughout the day were devoted to the Churchwardens’ Fund, for Church Expenses, and amounted to £4 1s 10d.

The new surplices were worn on Easter Day. Miss Claridge and Miss Ada Stevens helped to make them. They have all been well made, and many thanks are due to willing workers.

The early celebrations of the Holy Communion will, during the summer months, be at 8 a.m., instead of 8.30 a.m., on Sunday mornings.

The offertories for this month have been: For Sick and Poor 7s; for Churchwardens’ Fund £4 1s. 10d.; total £4 8s 10d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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June 1895 Brickhill (Great)

At the Easter Vestry the church wardens accounts were presented and passed, and there appeared a balance of close upon £10 on the right side. Sir P. Pauncefort Duncombe, Bart., was appointed by the Rector as churchwarden, and Mr. E. Lock was unanimously chosen as the other churchwarden. Messrs. Bloxham, Daborn, Hart, and Edward Woods were chosen as sidesmen.

Mr. Hickley, of Stockgrove, sent £5 towards church expenses which was much appreciated.

The bells of the church require re-hanging, and other repairs, and will cost little short of £100, at present there is only about £30 in hand towards this project. It is hoped that funds may be forthcoming, and that the work may be proceeded with.

It is proposed on Thursday, June 6, to show at the school the work done in the past year, and at the same time, at 3 p.m. in the afternoon, certain prizes will be distributed by Lady Duncombe to the scholars of the Day School. The prizes will be bought form the proceeds of the children’s entertainment given in the winter.

The offertories and collections for past month; Sick and poor, 7s 9d; church expenses. 12s 4¼ d. total £1 0s 1¼ d

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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July 1895 Brickhill (Great)

The festival of the Mother’s Union will be held at Great Brickhill, on Tuesday, July 23. The proceedings will close with a service in the church, when the sermon will be preached by the Rev. C. Ridgway, Vicar of Christ’s Church, Lancaster Gate.

There are other festivals in which this parish will join. A festival of the newly-formed leagues of North Bucks Church Teachers, which will be held in the grounds of Little Brickhill Vicarage, at the kind invitation of the Rev. W.B. Banting, and a meeting of the Girls’ Friendly Society on July 25, at Fenny Stratford, by kind invitation of Mr. Stubbs.

It is hoped that a meeting of the various church choirs in the neighbourhood may be arranged some time during the summer at Great Brickhill.

A tea was recently given to the parishes of Stoke Hammond and Great Brickhill by Mr. Finch, the --elected representative of the County Council. By kind permission of Sir Philip Pauncefort Duncombe, the fete was held in the playing field. There was a cricket match between Stoke Hammond and Great Brickhill, when the home team got beaten. There were races for the children, and a most excellent tea for all men, women and children. A band from Leighton Buzzard played and everybody seemed happy. Mr. and Mrs. Finch and their daughter and son -in-law, and Dr. and Mrs. Roberts were present. Lady Pauncefort Duncombe, Mrs. and Miss Matheson, Mrs. Cullen Maunsell, Rev. M. Nepean, and Mr. and Mrs. Tattersall from Stoke Hammond, were also present. A vote of thanks was accorded to Mr. Finch, who was declared to be the right man in the right place, and three hearty cheers were given for Sir Philip and Lady Pauncefort Duncombe. After some dancing the proceedings came to an end.

A meeting of the Parish Council was lately held , the Rev. M. Nepean in the chair, there were present, Messrs. Knight, Bowden, W. Clements. W. Turner, Sinfield, and Henman. Messrs. W. Clements, J. Sinfield, and Henman were appointed trustees to the Feoffe Charity, subject to the approval of the Charity Commissioners. The correspondence concerning the allotments between the Council and Mr. Ker, the agent to the estate, was read. It was decided to hold closed meetings. It was also decided that the Parish Council form the committee for carrying out technical education. Lady Pauncefort Duncombe being added to the committee. Attention was drawn to the stiles which were in a dilapidated and dangerous state, and the clerk was directed to communicate with the steward of the estate. The report of Messrs. Knight and Sinfield, the committee appointed to view the footpath to our wood, was received. Mr. Starker promised to meet the above, and arrange about it.

The offertories for the past month have been as follows: - Choir treat fund. £1 5s 3d; C. Hickley, Esq’s ditto £1; Girl’s Friendly Society, 8s 10d.; Archbishop’s mission to Assyrian Christians, £11 6½d.; church Expenses, 17s 9½d.; total £4 13s 5d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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August 1895 Brickhill (Great)

Lady Pauncefort Duncombe has presented to the church a most beautiful altar frontal for the season of Trinity. It was used for the first time on the First Sunday after Trinity, and is a fine specimen of Ecclesiastical work.

It is our pleasure to record an act of heroism on the part of Agnes Stevens, of this parish. A fire broke out at the farm house where she was living: it attacked a stable where there was a pony. Already had the fire burnt the halter, when she seized the pony and pulled it out of the stables. Her dress was much burnt, and she was otherwise injured. This done, by the help of others, the fire was prevented from spreading.

Miss Charlotte Woods, daughter of the late Mr. William Woods, for many years the much respected parish clerk, was married on July 9th last to Mr. A. Talmage. We wish them every happiness.

Mr. George Chew, of this parish, one of the four Commissioners of Income Tax, has offered £5 to start a fund towards buying the Priory, and throwing the ground into the Cemetery. This would, doubtless, be a great improvement. It is proposed to pull down the Priory and so open the burial ground to the road.

Seven Sunday School teachers have joined the new Church Teachers’ League for North Bucks. They are Miss Annie Tower, Miss Stevens, Mary Field, Eliza Meachem, Maud Arnold, Ada Stevens, and Mr.Arthur Cox.

Offertory and Collections - July 7, for churchyard, 9s 2d.; June 30, and July 14, 8 a.m., for S.P.G., 7s. 4d - total, 16s 6d

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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September 1895 Brickhill (Great)

A well arranged and successful meeting of the Mother’s Union was held in the grounds of Sir. Philip Pauncefort Duncombe on July 23rd last. Six parishes were represented. Great Brickhill, Little Brickhill, Woughton, Simpson, Stoke Hammond, and Walton. Lady Pauncefort Duncombe is the secretary for the Rural Deanery, and the excellent arrangements were under her supervision. The mothers, together with their associates, arrived about 3 p.m. There were also present. Mrs. Levi, Mrs. Tattersall, Mrs. Field, Mrs. Pain, Miss Pain, Mrs. Banting, and others. The grounds of Brickhill Manor were thrown open, and looking their very best, were much enjoyed by the mothers. A tent was erected in the park, and here an excellent tea was served. After tea Aunt Sally was enjoyed by the more active, whilst others strolled about the grounds. At 6.30 o’clock evensong was held in the church, the Rector taking the service, and the lessons being read by the Revs. W. B. Banting and F.F. Field. An excellent address was given by the Rev. Ravenscroft Stewart, vicar of All Saints, Ennismore Gardens. It was attentively listened to, and was well worthy of attention. Two points in it may well be remembered, first, that it is the duty of mothers to see that their children have proper and good companions; secondly, that mothers ought to see that their children when confirmed come to the Holy Communion; and the best way to do so, said the preacher, was to set them the example, to come themselves and bring their children also. After service the various contingents separated for their homes, all expressing their thanks to Lady Pauncefort Duncombe for the pleasant and profitable afternoon.

At the end of last month prizes were given away at the Great Brickhill Church of England School for regular attendance and good behaviour, in and out of school. The prizes were bought with the money taken at the entertainment, given by the scholars In the winter. Lady Pauncefort Duncombe undertook the distribution, and the Rev. Nepean addressed the children. Mrs. Cullen Maunsell also was present. Mr. and Mrs. Daborn were most successful in their expenditure of the money, and had provided some useful articles.

It is with much regret we record the death of the most respected and aged of the inhabitants of the parish, Mr. T. Woods, at the advanced age of 81 years, has recently passed away. He will missed by all classes; born and bred in Great Brickhill, for many years bailiff to the late Sir Philip Pauncefort Duncombe, for many years churchwarden, road surveyor, agent of the feoffe charity, and other parochial offices, he possessed an intimate knowledge of the parish, and its associations. When the old galley existed in the parish church he played the clarionet, and always to the very last took the greatest interest in all church matters. Though somewhat infirm of late years, his faculties remained quite clear to the very end. His memory and his mind were as keen as ever. The roads of Great Britain, which have been the pride of the parish, were superintended by him at a small cost to the rate payers, and when, upon the passing of the Parish Council Act, they were handed over to the District Council, the parish received a handsome grant. On all parochial matters he was an authority, and knew thoroughly the boundaries of the parish and various estates. His end came somewhat suddenly, but he had been ailing some little time. His power of finance were very great, and during his long life he used those powers for the benefit of the parish. When the addition was made to the churchyard, he was chosen a member of the Burial Board, and many other offices were pressed upon him which advancing years compelled him to decline. In all those offices he proved himself to have a clear head and sound judgment. His kindly disposition made him a friend to the poor of the parish, and his management of the Feoffe Charity has been of great advantage to them. He was buried on Monday , August 19 amid tokens of the greatest respect, and a large number were present at the funeral. The choir attended, and the organist played, after the hymn, Handel’s well-known Dead March in Saul. The day of the funeral was a lovely day, and the new burial ground, the prettiest in he neighbourhood, looked its very best; extensive views on all sides being obtained from it. Many wreaths of flowers testified to the love and affection in which he was held by many. The Rector performed the ceremony at the funeral. During Mr. Woods long life he had seen many changes, but he was no bigot, and kept an open mind on all subjects. His place will be difficult to supply, and it will be a long time before the name of Thomas Woods is forgotten.

The offertories during the past month have been:- For sick and poor, 13s. 11 ½d; 8 a.m., S..P.G., 5s 3d.; Church expenses (12s 3d from last month omitted). £1 11s 4 ½d.: total, £2 10s 7d.

Baptism Brickhill (Great) 1895

June 11 Ethel Mary, daughter of George Albert and Mary Ann Doe

June 24 Charles Henry, son of Charles and Mary Jane Tofield

June 24 Elizabeth May, daughter of John and Susannah Stevens

July 7 Edith Mary, daughter of Earnest and Ellen Evans.

Aug 4 Anna Kate, daughter of Joseph and Mary Elizabeth Mobbs.

Aug 12 (Adult Baptism), Sarah Jane, daughter of Joseph and Mary Eavestaff

Marriages Brickhill (Great) 1895

June 5 John Thomas Stevens and Mary Ann Cook.

July 9 Anthony Harry Talmage and Charlotte Woods

Burials Brickhill (Great) 1895

June 20 George Cook, aged 76 years.

July 29 Ann Whatley, aged 61 years.

Aug. 19 Thomas Woods, aged 81 years.

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October 1895 Brickhill (Great)

It is with the deepest regret we have to record the death of Sir Henry Pauncefort Duncombe, Bart. He was a patron of this church, and also, till the day of his death, Rector’s churchwarden. By his kind consideration for others he had attached himself to all in the village, and all regarded him with friendly and affectionate feelings. He took the greatest interest in all that concerned the parish, and was ever ready to help those in need. He seldom passed anyone he knew without a kind, cheery word, and his presence will be greatly missed by all. He was a man of high principle, and full of chivalry and honour. He was a staunch member of the Church of England, and a constant communicant. The outmost sympathy and regret was shown at his funeral, which was attended by many old and intimate friends. One old friend, the Rev. F. Veasey, who was formerly curate of Great Brickhill for 23 years, assisted the Rector in the funeral service, while many others of the neighbouring clergy were present to show their respect. There was a numerous gathering, too, of inhabitants with of the village present in the church and churchyard. Numerous wreaths and crosses of flowers from all classes testified to the love and affection with which he was regarded. The funeral service was choral, the xxxix Psalm being sung by the choir, as well as Hymn 165, “O God our help in ages past.” - On the Sunday following, at the evening service, special hymns were used , and special allusion was made to the sad event. The church was filled to its utmost capacity by a sympathetic congregation, and at its conclusion the greater part remained standing whilst the organist Mr. R. Cox, played Handel’s well known “Dead March.” At the comparatively early age of 46 Sir Philip Pauncefort Duncombe has been called to rest, but he has left behind him many relatives and friends who will sincerely mourn his loss. On all sides sympathy has been felt for Lady Pauncefort Duncombe.

The choir treat came off a short time since. A party of 27 in all travelled to Ramsgate in a saloon carriage attached to the train. All enjoyed themselves very much, and a most pleasant day was spent, home being reached a little after 1 a.m. The following kindly subscribed: - Sir P. Pauncefort Duncombe £2, Lady Pauncefort Duncombe 10s., Mrs. Cullen Maunsell £1, C. Hickley Esq. £1. Rev. M. Nepean £1, C. Tattersall, Esq., 10s, Mrs. Ruxton 5s., Mrs.Fountaine 5s, Mr. Locke 2s,Mr. Hammond 2s 6d., Mr. Belgrave 2s., collected in the church £1 4s. 9d., total £8 1s 3d. The expenses were rather more than this.

A meeting of the Parish Council was held on September 4. Present, Rev. M. Nepean (chairman), Messrs. Curtis, W. Knight, W. Turner, Henman, J. Sinfield. The Trustees of the Feoffe Charity agreed to waive their right to the appointment of new trustees provided the Parish Council would agree to those they had nominated. This was agreed to, and the following were proposed for the approval of the Charity Commissioners. Messrs. Adin, Sheffield, William Knight, William Clements, J. Curtis, Henman, and Sinfield. It was agreed that the Parish Council were satisfied that the proceedings are going on satisfactorily with regards to small holdings. It was proposed by Mr. Sinfield, and agreed to, that the Meade Charity be retained in the parish, and not handed over to the District Council, the money to be used for repairing stiles and other objects. It was agreed that the Local Government Board be written to on the subject of water agreement.

The following are the accounts of the Great Brickhill School, for the year ending May 31, 1895:-

Income
£.
s.
d.
Annual grant from Education Department
94
0
0
To fee grant
44
5
0
To voluntary contributions of private individuals
45
3
0
To income arising from the Department of Science and Art
1
7
0
184
15
0

To balance on May 11, 1895 (if overdrawn)
37
14
5
147
0
5

Expenditure
£.
s.
d.
Overdraft
27
4
2
Salaries - Daborn
125
3
0
Meachem
13
4
8
Field
10
3
10
Stationery materials for school use.
10
19
6
Printing balance sheets
6
6
Cheques., 4s Collector’s expenses
4
8
0
Books - Readers
1
7
10
Other books
5
4
Hymn books
9
10
Bibles
1
8
7
Needlework - Materials
4
0
Kindergarten
1
15
4
Grinding scissors
6
Coals
11
1
0
Cleaning - Mr. Mobbs
4
16
0
J. Mobbs
5
0
0

Materials for cleaning, including soap and towels for the children

9
11
Monitor
4
4
Furniture - Repairing clocks and locks
12
3
Water Rate
1
0
0
Basset’s charge on overdraft
2
7
Mr. J. Wood - Taking census
1
1
0
Commission on collecting subscriptions
1
5
0
222
9
5

The Harvest Thanksgiving Services were held in Great Brickhill Church on Thursday, September 19, and the sermon was preached by Rev. H. Mearne Vicar of S. Luke’s Maidenhead formerly Vicar of Stewkley

Offertories and collections for September- S. P. G., 5s 7d; Sick and poor, £1 5s 4d; Church expenses, £1 6s 8 ½ d; Total £2 17s 7 ½ d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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November 1895 Brickhill (Great)

The Harvest Thanksgiving Services were held in this parish last month, but were too late for more than a reference to in the last magazine. The Rev. H. Mear, Vicar of St. Luke’s, Maidenhead, formerly our neighbour, preached the sermon. The service were continued on the following Sunday, when there were good congregations. The church had been very prettily decorated, and the collections were for extending the heating apparatus and repairing, and altogether, the sum of £3 10s was collected.

The early Celebration on Sunday mornings will be during the winter months at 8.30 a.m.

The whole of the body of the church is now lighted with the Cathedral lamps, 6 new lamps having been recently purchased at a cost of 18s 6d each.

In the light of the school accounts published last month, the salary was put down to Mr. Daborn alone, it ought to have been credited to Mr. and Mrs. Daborn.

The following sums were collected: - September 29 and October 13, at Early Celebration, for S. P. G., 3s 0 ½d.; October 6, sick and Poor, 4s 1 ½d.; Harvest Thanksgiving £3 10s., October 20, Church Expenses, £1 3s 10d.; total £5 1s 7d.

No baptisms, marriages or burials printed for this month for Great Brickhill

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December 1895 Brickhill (Great)

The coal club tickets will bet distributed this month and there are altogether 63 members. Those who have paid 7s. Will receive half a ton of coal, and those who have paid 11s, will receive 1 ton. Lady Pauncefort Duncombe has subscribed over £10 towards this, but we can hardly expect this another year.

There will be an entertainment given by the school children at the school on January 1, at 3 p.m.and again on the following evening, January 2, at 7p.m., at popular prices. On the afternoon of January 1st., the seats will be 2s., 1s., and 6d.

The offertories for the past month have been: November 2, collections for Diocesan Fund,12s 7 ½ d.: November 17, for Church expenses, 17s 4 ½ d: Total £1 10s.

The Diocesan Inspector, the Rev. F. F. Field has kindly examined the school and we append his report. I have much pleasure

In sending a very favourable report of this school in all the three groups. I am sorry that I had time only to touch upon several of the subjects, but I could plainly see that the children had been thoroughly taught, and they seemed very anxious to tell me all they knew. 1.- The answering of the Infants was good and animated. 2. - Usually the Middle Group in a school is the least satisfactory, but this was not the case here. It is evident that these children have been carefully and reverently taught, and on Church lines. The weak point seems to be the writing out of the catechism. I daresay they would have repeated it better. 3.- The Oldest Class had also been well taught, and the amount of work prepared was considerable. The Litany” was the least satisfactory subject, but Mr. Daborn explained that he had not had time to teach the subject thoroughly. Throughout the school repetition of Holy Scripture, catechism, and hymns was satisfactory in amount and quality.- The children sang their hymn in good time and tune.

The discipline was excellent. Group 1. Infants Commended.- Daisy Sinfield, Emily Ball, Gertrude Ping, William Ruggies, Ella Land, Elsie Stevens, Gertrude Adams. Group 2. Commended .- James Stevens, William Spiers, Emily Turney, Edith Clements. Group 3. Bishop’s prize. Edith Adams, Commended. - Elsie Turner, Annie Tooth,, Wm. James Meachem, Patience Daborn, Rose Turney, marian King, Alice Cox.”

Baptism

Brick hill (Great) 1895

Sept. 1 James, son of James and Sarah Sylvester

Sept 29 Lewis, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Dicken

Sept. 29 Miriam Kate, daughter of George Richard and Martha Stevens..

Oct. 20 Henry Arthur, son of Alfred William and Agnes Mary Ann Dawborn

Nov. 10 Frank Wells, son of Charles and Annie Hanley.

Marriage Brickhill (Great)

Oct. 1 Thomas Bates and Emma Wiggington

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